The family universe, according to Durán

Vladimir Durán looks at the family unit in his first film, showing a somewhat conventional, difficult, and uncomfortable family to get to know 

Colombian filmmaker Vladimir Durán

10/24/2017.- Meeting Point premieres Adiós Entusiasmo [So Long Enthusiasm], the debut feature film by Colombian filmmaker Vladimir Durán. In the film, Durán delves into the intimacy of an unconventional family from Buenos Aires. Its protagonist, Axel, is a child who takes refuge in a rich inner world that has little to do with his exterior one: a family that interacts with their mother through the walls of the room in which she lives shut away.

The course of the film resorts to timelessness, anachronisms, and the combination of several home recordings, some even in VHS format, creating a family universe shown to focus on a moment of tension for the characters: the early celebration of the mother’s birthday.

“The acting work marked the development of the film. For ten years I have been working in a school in Buenos Aires with a very specific acting method that allows the performers some improvisation as well as the opportunity to follow their impulses. That makes some scenes lengthen and take on another intensity,” explained the director at the subsequent discussion. “It is a method that especially emphasizes the present, and provides a lot of freedom for the actors.”

Precisely this method is one of the reasons why the film is shot in widescreen format: “I needed ample room to capture more of the scenes, and to be attentive to all of the actors; the use of mirrors in the shots also have that intention,” clarified Durán. He also stated that he “does not like to explain many things in the plot, and prefers to leave some ambiguity for the viewer.”

Francisco Lezama and Agostina Gálvez

Short film ‘Dear Renzo’

The short before the screening was Dear Renzo, by Francisco Lezama and Agostina Gálvez, with actors from the same acting school as the feature film. It centers around three Argentines who interact with each other in New York City with a strong interest in economic and religious issues. “The importance of the dollar in Argentina is such that it distorts the identity of Argentines,” explained the directors on the motivation of the plot after the screening.

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Posted in 62nd Edition, Last, Meeting Point.